rollingstone:

Hear Michael Jackson and Freddie Mercury’s long lost duet, “There Must Be More to Life Than This.”

faking-glory:

postracialcomments:

quietlyexhale:

nishnasty:

#Repost from @junglebarbiejulia FULL STORY. On the night of August 10 2013 I went to DC for my birthday to go to “Park Place”, an upscale restaurant. Upon my arrival at the entrance, at 11:30pm, before going to stand in the very long line I went to ask a patrolling officer where a nearby restroom was and before I could utter the words, I was met with an elbow and a right punch to my face. I was instantly knock out. My police report (which has changed numerous times this year) say I was arrest and processed at 1:50 am which is 2 hours that I was unaccounted for. I was left on the floor and when I woke up I was bleeding in multiple places with drag marks on my toes, my wrist were cut by the cuffs, the back of my head and arms were lumpy. The officers wouldn’t tell me why I was in jail and I overheard them saying what should we charge her with? We can’t say domestic, we don’t know who she is with. After pleading and begging to go to the hospital, I was met with more hostility before they finally let me go to the hospital the next days upon my release I had a rape kit done because I don’t know any thing that happened to me while knocked out and it came back positive for semen. They sent messages from my phone while I was detained. Internal Affairs came and confiscated my clothing (they never returned them) and they stole my rape kit. As of today I am facing charges for fighting a bouncer outside of the Lima Club, I was never there and its 5 minutes away from Park driving, also 5 officers that responded after I punched the manager to I was apparently Mike Tyson because when I woke up in jail I had the strength and gumption to fight some more officers in there. When the video was requested both clubs said they lost them. They follow me and stalk my home to this day, I have caught DC police trying to get in my home when they thought I had left, even the Baltimore cops help protect them, one in the rape department even asked me out on a date while my face was still battered. I have been trying to tell my story on IG only to find that police officers or this hired by then have been spamming my hashtag #justiceforjulia with blasphemous pictures. Please share her story.

postracialcomments

BOOST!!!!!

This is the video from the stills posted!!!

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=679216132168166&set=vb.159600104129774&type=2&theater

Spread this around!!!

This breaks my heart. I am so sorry that this happened to you I wouldn’t know how to handle myself, stay strong!

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gracefullyvintage:

Jim Carrey 

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pharaohus:

HOW

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theblacksophisticate:

atane:

zuky:

nezua:

Flappers shaming Miley Cyrus.

Oddly enough we could say that Miley Cyrus is following solidly in the appropriative footsteps of white flappers, who in the 1920s grabbed national attention and stirred alarmism concerning the end of civilization because they partied to Black music, wore their hair short like Josephine Baker (who fled US racism to become a superstar in Europe), and imitated dance moves from Baker and other Black dancers. The famously flapperesque Charleston was lifted from the African American dance called the Juba, which had West African roots and was danced in secret in the South and the Caribbean. The dance sped up when it reached Harlem, giving birth to both tap dancing and the Broadway hit called The Charleston, which spread like wildfire from there. White people didn’t sway their hips this scandalously prior to that era, making flappers roughly equivalent to white twerkers of the Jazz Age.

This is 100% true. The period from the jazz age to the beat generation, comparatively speaking was the height of cultural appropriation of black art. The beat generation used lingo popularized by Lester Young. They then appropriated the style, dress, and lingo of bebop musicians like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, down to the beret, glasses, and soul patch. Bebop musicians, Parker and Gillespie in particular, were the blueprint of their image. Norman Mailer wrote an essay titled “The White Negro" that tackles this phenomenon. I’m no fan of Norman Mailer, but at least he admitted that white people were stealing from blacks. He wrote it in 1957.

With regards to the flappers, apart from Josephine Baker, they also liberally borrowed from black vaudeville performers. They would copy dance moves from black performers, and then introduce it as their own. Many dances attributed to whites are from black vaudeville performers who were forced to perform on the chitlin’ circuit because of segregation and Jim Crow laws.

It really is astonishing how nothing has changed in this regard. For example, people to this day still call Benny Goodman “the king of swing”, when what he did was procure charts for arrangements from Fletcher Henderson, a black man. Goodman’s biggest hits were from Henderson. It’s amazing how much credit Goodman gets for another man’s work. Of course Goodman became “the king of swing”, while Fletcher Henderson remains a footnote in history. How a white man becomes the king of something innovated by blacks is astounding. Benny Goodman is called “the king of swing”. Paul Whiteman is called “the king of jazz”. Elvis Presley is called “the king of rock n roll”. Is Eminem the king of rap? What about Justin Timberlake and Robin Thicke with r&b? Miley is soon on her way to become “the queen of twerking”.

Anyway, apart from getting his charts from Fletcher Henderson, Benny Goodman got his ass handed to him by Chick Webb at the Savoy Ballroom when they had a battle of the bands. Goodman is often noted as being one of the few white men in the segregation era to have black men in his band, and the narrative is typically presented as if he did it out of benevolence. He did it because there was no way to get around the fact that swing music was the domain of black folks, and he poached the best black players he could find to bolster his band, and black musicians went with him because as a white man, he was able to pay them more than black bandleaders, and they wouldn’t have to deal with indignity while traveling. Many hotels refused black bands, so they often had to sleep in cars, bus terminals, or crash at the homes of hospitable blacks. A big portion of Duke Ellington’s money went towards renting out train cars and making sure his orchestra had a place to sleep while on the road because hotels often turned them down because they were black. These were issues Goodman wasn’t going to face. Black musicians certainly didn’t go with him because he was the best. Goodman even later hired Henderson to arrange and play in his band. He wasn’t doing it because he loved black people. Black people were the ones creating and innovating. Where else would he get the best charts and arrangements? Now that the smoke has cleared and the dust has settled, Goodman gets all the credit. Funny how that works.

This stuff has been going on for a long time. Miley is the 2013 version. Twerking has been around for a long time, but Miley convulses on national tv and all of a sudden, dictionary definitions of twerking are made. Definitions complete with no mention of black people, like all this happened in a vacuum. It’s history repeating itself over and over again. I see the same thing happening with afrobeat music.

The more you know.

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#history  

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convolucion:

Nema-ye Nazdik (Close-up), Abbas Kiarostami (1990)

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theniftyfifties:

Elizabeth Taylor

Get out, just get the fuck out.

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nylesvanial:

Ladies and Gentlemen We are Floating in Space > Kid A > Loveless > High Expectations/Low Results > Innerspeaker.

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mamaadweyaashkaa:

mangomamita:

Corsican vendetta knife with floral detail

che la mia ferita sia mortale
"may my wound be deadly"

holy shit

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